CURRICULUM VITAE

Don Fallis
Professor
School of Information
Adjunct Professor
Department of Philosophy
Faculty
Program in Cognitive Science

University of Arizona

1103 East Second Street
Tucson, AZ 85721

(520) 621-3565
fallis@email.arizona.edu
si.arizona.edu/users/don-fallis


Education -- Employment -- Awards -- Publications -- Presentations -- Grants -- Teaching


CHRONOLOGY OF EDUCATION

Colleges Attended: Degrees: Dissertation: Major Fields:

CHRONOLOGY OF EMPLOYMENT


HONORS AND AWARDS


SERVICE


PUBLICATIONS

Journal Articles and Book Chapters:

on Lying and Deception:
on Lying and Deception in Popular Culture:
on Epistemology:
on Philosophy of Mathematics:
on Information Ethics:
on Information Accuracy:
Papers in Conference Proceedings: Cited but Unpublished Manuscripts: Works Edited: Encyclopedia Entries: Opinion Pieces: Reviews:

WORKS IN PROGRESS                                                               


SCHOLARLY PRESENTATIONS

Colloquia: Conference Presentations: Commentaries:

GRANTS AND CONTRACTS


TEACHING EXPERIENCE

Instructor: Teaching Associate: Teaching Assistant:

NOTES

1 See the discussion of this article in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
2 See Etica & Politica, 14, 1, (2012): 306-307 for Floridi's response.
3
See Andreas Stokke's response to this article in the Australasian Journal of Philosophy, 95, 1, (2017): 178-183.
4 This article looks at Alvin Goldman's project in Knowledge in a Social World (Oxford University Press, 1999) from the perspective of information science. See pp. 331-332 in the same issue for Goldman's response.
5 See John Artz's review of this article in Computing Reviews from the ACM.
6 See Jessica Wittmer's review of this article on Amazon.com.  Wittmer claims that there are at least two philosophical mistakes in this article.  First, she claims that "the Principal Principle has little to do with how probability should guide one's life."  However, if a principle of this sort (i.e., one that says how subjective probabilities should relate to objective chances) is not guiding her life, she is in serious trouble (and not just at the poker table).
     Now, there are certainly other principles that should also guide one's life.  Most notably, if your subjective probabilities are not coherent (e.g., if you assign a probability of 0.9 to a coin coming up heads and a probability of 0.9 to that coin coming up tails), you are subject to a Dutch Book.  That is, there is set of bets that you consider fair that is guaranteed to cost you money.
    But if your subjective probabilities do not match the objective chances (e.g., if you assign a probability of 0.9 to a fair coin coming up heads), there is a bet that you consider fair that is objectively likely to cost you money even if your subjective probabilities are coherent.  See, e.g., page 218 of "Probability as a Guide to Life" by Helen Beebee and David Papineau.
    Wittmer does not even say what she thinks the second mistake in this article is.  (She leaves finding it as an exercise for the reader.)  As a result, it is harder for me to pin down why she is wrong about that one.

7 This article has been reprinted in Global Information Technologies: Concepts, Methodologies, Tools, and Applications, ed. Felix B. Tan, Information Science Reference (2008): 3091-3104.
8 See pp. 52-54 in the same issue for Marc Meola's  response to this article.
9 This is an abridged and revised version of my "Toward an Epistemology of Wikipedia."  See the discussion of this article in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
10 See Cristian Calude's review of this article in MathSciNet from the AMS.
11 See A. A. Mullin's review of this article in MathSciNet from the AMS.  See critical discussions of this article by Kenny Easwaran and Jeffrey C. Jackson in Philosophia Mathematica.  Also, see the discussion of this article in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. 
12 See pp. 389-395 in the same issue for Aaron Lercher's  response to this article.
13 See Library Quarterly, 72, 3, (2002): 275-293 for Tony Doyle's critical discussion of this article.
14 See the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association, 9, 4, (2002): 402-403 for Dr. Carroll, Dr. Saluja, and Dr. Tarczy-Hornoch's response to this article.
15 The results in this manuscript are cited by Alvin Goldman in "Quasi-objective Bayesianism and Legal Evidence", Jurimetrics, 42, 3, (2002): 237-260, in "Reply to Commentators", Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 64, 1, (2002): 215-227, and in Pathways to Knowledge, Oxford University Press, (2002).
16 Cited by Pierre Le Morvan in "Goldman on Knowledge as True Belief", Erkenntnis, 62, 2, (2005):145-155.
17 See Library Journal, 125, 3, (2000): 134-136 for reader responses.  The original article has also been reprinted in the Section on Education and Training Bulletin, 1, 3, (2000) of the International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions.
18 An earlier version of this talk was presented to the Department of Philosophy and the Department of Mathematics, Texas Tech University, 1996.
19 An earlier version of this talk was presented at the Spring Meeting of the Southwestern Section of the Mathematical Association of America, Silver City, New Mexico, 1999.
20 An earlier version of this talk was presented to the School of Library and Information Science, Indiana University, 2000.
21 An earlier version of this talk was presented to the Department of Philosophy, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, 2000.
22 An earlier version of this talk was presented to the Department of Philosophy, Northern Arizona University, 2002, to the Department of Philosophy, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, 2003, and to the School of Information Science and Policy, State University of New York at Albany, 2003.
23 An earlier version of this talk was presented to the Department of Philosophy, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, 2004, to the School of Information Resources and Library Science, University of Arizona, 2004, and to the Department of Philosophy, University of Arizona, 2004.
24 An earlier version of this talk was presented to the Department of Library and Information Science, Rutgers University, 2004 and to the Department of Philosophy and Religion, Montclair State University, 2005. 
25 An earlier version of this talk was presented at the Pacific Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association, Pasadena, California, 2008, to the Department of Philosophy, University of Arizona, 2008, to the Philosophy Club, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, 2007, and to the Philosophy Club, Rutgers University, 2007.
26 An earlier version of this talk was presented to a seminar on "Ethics of Technology", Eindhoven University of Technology, 2012 and to the Freedom Center, University of Arizona, 2012.
27 An earlier version of this talk was presented to the Freedom Center, University of Arizona, 2016 and to the School of Information, University of Arizona, 2016.
28 An earlier version of this talk was presented to the School of Information, University of Arizona, 2017.
29 An earlier version of this talk was presented at the UA-ASU Cognitive Science Conclave, Arizona State University, 2016, to the School of Information, University of Arizona, 2017, to the Master Seminar on the "Foundations of Judgment and Decision Making", University of Arizona, 2017, to the Department of Philosophy, University of Miami, 2017.
30 An earlier version of this talk was presented at the Winter Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic, San Francisco, California, 1995.
31 An earlier version of this talk was presented to the Department of Philosophy, University of California, Irvine, 1995 and at the Joint Meeting of the Northern and Southern California Sections of the Mathematical Association of America, San Luis Obispo, California, 1995.
32 An earlier version of this talk was presented at the Fall Meeting of the Southern California Section of the Mathematical Association of America, Fullerton, California, 1996.
33 An earlier version of this talk was presented at the Spring Meeting of the Association for Symbolic Logic, Los Angeles, California, 1998 and at the Computing and Philosophy Conference, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 1996.
34 An earlier version of this talk was presented at the Computing and Philosophy Conference (held as part of the 20th World Congress of Philosophy), Boston, Massachusetts, 1998.
35 An earlier version of this talk was presented to the Interdisciplinary Workshop on "Normative versus Cognitive-Descriptive Aspects of Probability and Utility: An Encounter with Richard C. Jeffrey", University of Arizona, 2000.
36 An earlier version of this talk was presented at the Annual Conference of the Association for Library and Information Science Education, Washington, DC, 2001, at the Annual Conference of the Association for Library and Information Science Education, San Antonio, Texas, 2000, and at the Annual Conference of the Arizona Library Association, Phoenix, Arizona, 2000.
37 An earlier version of this talk was presented at an International Conference on "Perspectives on Mathematical Practices", Brussels, Belgium, 2002, at the Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for History and Philosophy of Mathematics, Québec, Canada, 2001, and to the Department of Mathematics, Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, 2001.
38 An earlier version of this talk was presented to the Department of Philosophy, Middlebury College, 2003 and to the Department of Philosophy, Charles Sturt University, 2003.
39 An earlier version of this talk was presented at the Computing and Philosophy Conference, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 2004.
40 An earlier version of this talk was presented to the Department of Philosophy, University of Arizona, 2005 and to the Department of Logic and Philosophy of Science, University of California, Irvine, 2005.
41 An earlier version of this talk was presented to the School of Information Resources and Library Science, University of Arizona, 2006.
42 An earlier version of this talk was presented at the North American Computing and Philosophy Conference, Chicago, Illinois, 2007 and to the School of Information Resources and Library Science, University of Arizona, 2007.
43 An earlier version of this talk was presented at the North American Computing and Philosophy Conference, Chicago, Illinois, 2007 and to the School of Information Resources and Library Science, University of Arizona, 2006.
44 An earlier version of this talk was presented at the Information Ethics Roundtable, Tucson, Arizona, 2009.
45 An earlier version of this talk was presented to the Philosophy Club, University of St. Andrews, 2011 and to a seminar on "Lies and Deception", Yale University, 2011.
46 An earlier version of this talk was presented to the Department of Philosophy, University of Sheffield, 2011, at the Annual Conference of the New Mexico West Texas Philosophical Society, Las Cruces, New Mexico, 2012, and at the Eastern Division Meeting of the American Philosophical Association, Atlanta, Georgia, 2012.
47 An earlier version of this talk was presented to the School of Information Resources and Library Science, University of Arizona, 2012 and to the Philosophy Club, University of Arizona, 2013.
48 An earlier version of this talk was presented to the School of Information Resources and Library Science, University of Arizona, 2013 and to the Philosophy Club, University of Arizona, 2013.
49 An earlier version of this talk was presented to the Information Quality Research Group, Lund University, 2014, to the Department for the Study of Culture, University of Southern Denmark, 2014, to the Department of Philosophy, University of Utah, 2014, at the Information Ethics Roundtable, Madison, Wisconsin, 2015, at the Cognitive Science Brown Bag, University of Arizona, 2015, at the Annual Meeting of the International Association for Computing and Philosophy, Palo Alto, California, 2017.
50 An earlier version of this talk was presented to the Freedom Center, University of Arizona, 2014.
51 An earlier version of this talk was presented to the Tanner Humanities Center, University of Utah, 2015.

This is a true and accurate statement of my activities and accomplishments. I understand that misrepresentation in securing promotion and tenure may lead to dismissal or suspension under ABOR Policy 6-201 I.1.b.


This document was last updated on May 14, 2018.